The Best Composting Toilets for Your Mobile or Tiny Home

No water, no flushing, and no sewage system

We are forced to think of a substitute when we know that we use 7,665 gallons of water every year in the US. Composting toilets are an excellent alternative for such a problem. If you are searching best composting toilet for a tiny house, RV or Boat, you are in the right place. These toilets are mainly a common type in small houses.

Composting toilets turn out to be best because they turn your waste into compost and reduces water consumption. They are also straightforward to use and run with little water or no water.

What is a Composting Toilet?

Before we begin, it is important to know what a compost toilet is. Compost toilets are eco-friendly and extremely reliable means of managing one’s waste. It can convert your waste into usable fertilizer. No water, no flushing, and no sewage system are the three main motos.

Composting toilet system is a processing unit for toilet paper, human excreta, and other waste material. These are also known as waterless toilets, dry toilets, etc. The human excrement is mixed with coir, sawdust, and peat moss to assist the aerobic processing, and they absorb liquids and eliminate odor.

This process in composting toilet is fast as compared to other like in septic tanks. This way, all the waste is converted into a dry product that can be handled with the least risk and can be used as a natural fertilizer in the soil for plants and trees.

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Why use a compost toilet?

As stated earlier, compost toilets are incredibly environmentally friendly. Furthermore, the compost toilet can convert your waste into fertilizer that you can use to enrich your soil. These toilets also have the additional benefit of eliminating bad odors, which is due to bowel movements.

  • Composting toilets do not require water or flushing. Therefore they reduce domestic water consumption and our good for the environment.
  • When we compost our own waste it can be used to fertilize trees and landscaping and gardens
  • They provide the benefits of minimizing our impact on local sewer and water systems.
  • It is much cheaper to use a composting toilet than to install a full septic system.
  • Underground drain fields can pollute the ground water supply.
  • Composting toilets eliminate the need for complex waste treatment plants.
  • Composting toilets are the green way of disposing of human waste.
  • Composting toilets are a convenient addition to your RV, poolside, off-grid cabin or garage.
  • Composting toilets keep human excrement out of the household waste water allowing the remaining greywater from the kitchen, shower and washing machine to be used to water lawns and trees.
  • If greywater recycling is impractical, a composting toilet will still greatly prolong the life of your septic system and reduce pump-out and maintenance costs (usually $200 to $300 every other year).
  • When designed and operated properly, composting toilets are clean, odor-free and will kill the pathogens in human excrement that spread disease while creating fertilizer and saving a lot of water.
  • One person using a composting toilet can produce more than 80 pounds of compost and save more than 6,600 gallons of water per year.
  • While composting toilets make environmental sense, they also can put dollars and cents back into your pocket by reducing your water bills and extending the life of your septic system.
  • The solid waste is dealt with on site, and doesn’t have to be treated with chemicals in sewage farms, or end up in waterways.

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What to Consider When Choosing Composting Toilet?

If you are seriously considering purchasing a composting toilet, there are several issues to keep in mind as you review different models to ensure that the composting toilet model you purchase will work efficiently and reliably in your home or whatever the purpose.

Space Availability:

First, you need to consider what capacity you really need given the location and daily use the composting toilet is likely to receive. Be certain that you are selecting a composting toilet that is large enough for your needs. A good rule of thumb is purchasing a composting toilet model with at least 25-40% greater capacity than you think you will need. That will allow both for a margin of error and the ability to add user or two if circumstances change. Often the price difference between a small and medium-sized composting toilet system is neglected as well. An extra couple hundred dollars spent today may be well worth the expense in a few years when an unexpected family member comes for a long-term stay!

User Capability:

How many people will be using the composting toilet and for how long? Some units are ideal for seasonal use, such as for weeks-long outings at the cottage, but will not stand up to regular, year-round household use. Conversely, purchasing a central composting toilet for that same cottage may be expensively unnecessary. Failure to properly assess composting toilet capacity is one of the prevailing mistakes people make when buying a composting toilet. The majority of negative composting toilet experiences are due to improper installations and usage beyond what the unit can handle.

Type of Use:

When sizing a system, you will also need to consider whether it will use occasionally or regularly, daily usage. This is especially true if you are considering purchasing a self-contained model. Although some self-contained models boost capacity for four or more people capacity, this is only based on “occasional” usage.

Feature Type:

Your first and most basic consideration should be the type of composting toilet. Do you want a self-contained or central unit? If you’re installing in your home, both options may be possible, but if you’re installing in a small cottage or on a boat, you may be limited to self-contained units. Generally, self-contained composting toilets are more versatile than central ones, and there are few locations where a central composting toilet would fit that a self-contained toilet would not.

Electric Vs. non- electric Model

You will also need to decide whether you will be purchasing an electric model or a non-electric composting toilet. Non-electric models are ideal for remote, off-grid locations and cabins and houses where the toilets will only occasionally use. But for regular, daily use, your family may appreciate the ease of the electric models. You may find that you have fewer problems maintaining the correct moisture level and no odor problems with an electric model. In contrast, a non-electric model may require regular, often daily, maintenance to keep it in order.

Law And Other Stuff

Finally, you should look into the building codes for your area and see if any requirements need to be met by your composting toilet system. By installing your composting toilet up to code, you will avoid any problematic issues down the road if you ever decide to sell your home.

Switching from a flush toilet system to a toilet composting system is one of the best environmental choices you can make for your household. It is scientifically tested that a single composting toilet can save over 26 gallons of water in a single day. You will also be producing a valuable end-product (humus) that will further benefit the environment.

By keeping these criteria in mind as you review composting toilet models, you will be able to assure that the model you purchase is right for you and your family and avoid disappointment and frustration down the line.

Portable vs. Composting
Tank Capacity
Utility Usage
Odor Removal

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What types of composting toilets are there?

If you are seriously considering purchasing a composting toilet, there are several issues to keep in mind as you review different models to ensure that the composting toilet model you purchase will work efficiently and reliably in your home or whatever the purpose.

There are two main types of composting toilets:

  1. Self-contained
  2. Central

All composting toilets are made up of a pair of basic components, a bowl, and a waste receptacle. In self-contained units, the entire system is fully enclosed. In other words, the bowl and waste receptacle fit in (or on) one body. A central unit, on the other hand, consists of a bowl connected to a separate waste receptacle, which is usually installed somewhere below the bowl and conveniently out of sight.

Self-contained units are thereby simpler and easier to install than central units, but they also take up more physical space in the bathroom. Central units need extra space somewhere other than the bathroom, but they have the advantage of appearing to be regular flush toilets. Self-contained units are more suited for cottages and seasonal residences while central units are usually better for year-round residences.

There are also two other considerations:

  1. Is the toilet waterless?
  2. Does it require electricity?

All self-contained composting toilets are waterless. Some central composting toilet systems, however, do require water to function. These central units, usually called low flush or 1 pint flush systems, are meant primarily for use in homes and other places with a high capacity need, but the amount of water used by these systems is still significantly less than in normal flush toilets. As a point of reference, consider that (a) the Energy Policy Act of 1992 made 1.6 gallons per flush the mandatory federal maximum for new toilets in the U.S., and (b) 1 pint is equal to 0.125 gallons.

The second question concerns electricity. While many composting toilets do not require electricity, a fair number do come in modified electric versions or can be boosted, and their capacity increased, through the use of electric fans. These fans speed up the drying process and aid ventilation. The amount of electricity required to power such fans is low and can typically be generated via even a small solar power system.

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Top Brand For Composting Toilets

Most of the time, people are obsessed with brands, and it is human nature. Especially when if it is your lifestyle products, there is definitely no doubt. According to my research and reviews from other experts, sun mar and the natured head are the most popular brand in the market.

Sun-Mar

Sun-Mar is the forerunner of the composting toilet industry since the 1960s. Different manufacturers have tried different methods to achieve these goals, but none has proved as efficient as the Bio-drum, designed by Sun-Mar. In their design, all three tasks/processes require independent chambers, and this isolates each step into its own separate environment. This revolutionary three-chamber approach is incorporated into all Sun-Mar units.

Natures Head

The toilet is self-contained, urine-diverting, and the waterless operation allows for ease of use for many applications. Nature's Head is lightweight, odorless, and compact, making it a perfect fit for your home, cabin, tiny house, RV, workshop, boat, and survival application.

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What are the Advantages and Disadvantagesof Composting Toilets

Composting toilets have undergone great changes in the last few years, and they are becoming increasingly easier to use and maintain by users. Toilet composting is also a technology that helps manage the ongoing problem of dealing with human waste in a productive, environmentally friendly, and sustainable manner. But as with any technology, there are both advantages and disadvantages of using composting toilets.

If you are considering investing in a composting toilet, here are some of the benefits and challenges of toilet composting that you should consider:

Advantages of Composting Toilets

One of the primary advantages of using a composting toilet is that by composting human waste and then using the end product as a soil amendment for trees and non-edible plants, you will be contributing positively to the environment. Human toilet waste becomes a resource instead of a problem to be disposed of or treated in this system.

Composting toilets also benefit the environment by preserving another valuable natural resource: water. Composting systems reduce or eliminate the need for water for flushing and thus dramatically reduces water consumption and waste.

Many composting toilet systems can also accept kitchen wastes, thus further reducing household waste and simplifying the composting process (especially for apartment dwellers who may not have an easy way of composting vegetable matter).

By eliminating the need for transporting human waste to facilities for treatment and disposal, composting toilets reduce and pressure on large infrastructure facilities that deal with human waste and the need for new treatment facilities to be built.

A composting toilet does not require a sewer system hook-up. For some, this means shedding an additional layer of dependence and thereby gaining an extra bit of freedom, being “off grid,” while for others the benefit is strictly practical: they can install a composting toilet where a standard toilet just isn’t feasible, e.g. in a cottage, camp or other seasonal dwelling, which perhaps lack running water, electricity or both.

A composting toilet uses significantly less water than a regular toilet. In fact, many composting toilets, known as waterless systems, use no water at all. The benefit is again two-fold. Not only does being waterless equal more freedom and a lower cost, but it also protects local water sources from contamination and preserves the fresh water that we still have. This alone makes composting toilets environmentally friendly and far more sustainable than regular toilets.

A composting toilet helps recycle nutrients back into nature. Once the composting process is complete, the volume of the original human waste is about 97% less and it is actually good for plants and the environment.

Disadvantages of Composting Toilets

Most of the disadvantages of toilet composting are a result of faulty installation and maintenance. The primary disadvantage is the maintenance of composting toilets. It requires learning new practices and habits and ultimately requires more responsibility by users and owners than conventional flush toilet systems.

Improper maintenance can make cleaning some models unpleasant, lead to odor problems, and create health hazards. (These tend not to be problems, however, if the models are used correctly). If the composting toilet system is not adequately maintained, removing the end-product can be an especially unpleasant task.

Finally, composting toilets are often considerably more expensive upfront than flush toilet systems. Over time, however, many composting toilets will pay for themselves as they require reduced sewage and infrastructure costs and produce a valuable resource end-product.

By considering both the advantages and disadvantages of a composting toilet, you should be able to appreciate both the benefits and responsibilities of these systems.

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What are the Common Myths About Composting Toilets

MYTH: Composting toilets are dirty.

  • FACT: Composting toilets are as clean as regular flush toilets. Surprise! This means they’re as clean as you keep them. There is nothing inherently dirtier about composting toilets. The idea itself likely derives from negative connotations associated with composting, which people usually picture as big, open-air piles of decomposing organic waste. A composting toilet is not a compost heap.

MYTH: Composting toilets require you to handle feces.

  • FACT: A composting toilet is also not just a bucket of crap. What you handle in a composting toilet is not feces; it’s compost. If you use your composting toilet properly, by the time you remove the now-composted material, not only has it shrunk by 97%, but it resembles dirt and is wholly inoffensive.

MYTH: Composting toilets smell.

  • FACT: A properly maintained composting toilet used within its capacity limits does not smell at all. And if you add an electric fan, the whole process of going to the bathroom will smell less than on a regular toilet. It’s not difficult to understand why. Just imagine a regular flush toilet but with a ventilation system pulling any odors directly from your toilet and expelling them outside.

MYTH: Composting toilets are solely for people who live out in the country.

  • FACT: Composting toilet is for everyone. Whether you live in the city, the suburbs, on a farm, in an RV, or on a boat doesn’t matter. You can have a composting toilet. Indeed, you can have a composting toilet in more places than you could have a regular flush toilet. However, that’s really only half of this myth busted. The other half is implied: only people who live out in the country, i.e., backwater bumpkins, want a composting toilet. Why? Because composting toilets are dirty, require you to handle feces, and they smell bad…

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FAQs About Composting Toilets

If you consider purchasing a toilet composting system, you likely have any questions about choosing, maintaining, and using your system. Here are some of the most common questions people ask when researching, installing, and using a toilet composting system:

How to Build a Composting Toilet

If you are looking for a way to lessen your ecological footprint and participate positively in solutions to improve the environment, then you should seriously consider switching from a flush toilet to a composting toilet system. Flush toilets waste enormous amounts of water each year, but composting toilets operate with little or no water and their end product (compost) is a valuable soil amendment as well.

However, one downside of switching to composting toilets is that the manufactured brands can be quite expensive – generally starting around $1500 for a basic, no-frills model. However, building a composting toilet on your own for well under $50 in materials is possible.

Owner built (also called site built) composting toilets are generally passive in design – meaning they rely on natural instead of mechanical forces. Since they do not have a built in electrical unit, they will need to be monitored more closely than manufactured composting toilets and involve more labor in terms of their care and maintenance (more on this below, in the section “How to Use Your New Composting Toilet”). However, some would say that with this responsibility comes rewards including an intimate knowledge of how your body is literally recycling waste positively into the environment.

This project will only take a few hours once all items needed to build it are assembled. The finished composting toilet will be 18″ wide and 21″ long.

Materials You Will Need to Build a Composting Toilet

You will need to cut a top in the plywood where the seat hole is (draw a circle to cut out using the seat as a template on the top of the composting toilet). The hole should be set about 1 ½ inch back from the front edge of the plywood. When screwing or nailing the legs to the inside of the box, be sure that the top edge of the box is about 1/2″ below the top edge of the five-gallon bucket, so that the rim will sit tight against the underside of the toilet seat.

Now that you have finished your composting toilet, it’s ready to use. Well, yes, technically, but there are some additional materials you will need to keep the composting process in order:

1) A Compost Bin. Unlike most manufactured, active designs where the composting process takes place inside a chamber attached to the toilet when you build a composting toilet based on the above passive design, you will have to transport it to a composting bin outdoors it to undergo the composting process. You may want to locate this composting bin in your garden next to your normal garden composting pile, and you may need more than one bin if there are many people in your household. For more information about purchasing or building your own compost bin, read our article.

2) Organic “Brown Matter.” This will be used to cover your “deposits” when using the toilet to create a balanced compost formula. This can be sawdust, peat moss, leaves, hay straw, rice hulls, or any other relatively dry and brown organic matter.

You want to ensure that your composting toilet creates nutrient-rich compost that is clean and odor-free (this finished compost is often referred to as “humanure”). To create this, you will need to ensure that they sprinkle the organic brown matter on top whenever anyone uses the toilet. The material in the bucket should be moist, but not wet.

Once a bucket is fully, you will need to transport it outside to your composting bin, while placing an empty five-gallon bucket in the toilet to replace the full one. In my experience, people often wait until they have three or four full containers (depending how many they have in reserve) to do all the emptying and cleaning at once. This is not a terribly pleasant task, although it is also not as unpleasant as you might imagine it to be as well. Be sure to cover the emptied waste with additional brown material and to clean the buckets well so that no odors will linger. You should not need to turn this material, and it should compost on its own to create a rich humus material in six months to a year.

Q. How do composting toilets work?

A: composting toilet uses the natural processes of decomposition & evaporation to recycle human waste. Typical waste entering the toilet is over 90 percent water. The composting cycle evaporates the wastewater and which is carried back to the atmosphere through the vent system. The remaining small amount of solid material is converted into a useful fertilizing soil by natural decomposition. The correct balance between moisture, oxygen, heat, and organic material is needed to ensure a rich environment for the aerobic bacteria that transform the waste into fertilizing soil. This ensures odor-free operation and complete decomposition of waste.

When you consider that the average American uses 7,665 gallons of water (that’s approximately 2,400 cases – 24 count – of bottled water) each year just flushing the toilet, it makes you wonder about an alternative.

Important Note: When human waste is properly composted, the end-product does not contain any pathogens or viruses (these are destroyed by bacterial breakdown). This nutrient-rich fertilizer can then be used on plants or around the base of trees, as part of the natural cycling of nutrients, reducing your need for commercial fertilizers and preserving local water quality. It’s recommended that the fertilizer be used on non-edible gardens & plants.

The 3 important processes a composting toilet must perform:

Compost the waste and toilet paper quickly and without odor
Ensure that the finished compost is safe and easy to handle
Evaporate the liquid
Q. How do you install a composting toilet?

Composting in general means a natural process of decomposing, and recycling organic materials into a humus-rich soil. It happens by the action of bacteria, fungi, or earthworms. Composting brings many advantages on the environment, and that is why the new concept of compost toilets is famous. It is necessary to learn how to use a composting toilet, as it will become useful for you if you are thinking of the goodness of the environment.

Composting toilets are eco-friendly. They have other similar names such as dry toilets and biological toilets. They are helpful to the environment. Composting toilets help in resource recovery, and some even call them “ecosan toilets.” It is also called “sawdust toilets.”

What these compost toilets do is they turn human waste into compost. A compost toilet does not have a flush, and it does not connect to a sewage system. This kind of toilets does not use water to be washed. This kind of toilets is employed in areas where there is no suitable water supply or sewage treatment plant. For example, you would see some of these in places such as national parks, cottages, and in developing countries with limited water. These toilets are also suitable for rural areas or parks that lack an adequate water supply, sewers, and sewage treatment. Composting toilets reduce the environmental footprint. Feces and urine as are used as fertilizers and soil conditioners for gardening or ornamental activities.

The article will show you how to use a composting toilet. These toilets work on a different procedure where carbon additives such as sawdust, coconut coir, or peat moss are added to create air pockets in the human excreta. When some of these raw materials add to the human excreta, the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio will be improved reducing the potential odor.

Are essential components necessary for how to use a composting toilet?

A composting toilet has two elements. It has a place to sit or squat and a collection/composting unit. The composting unit is divided into four main parts again. The four main components are storage or a composting chamber, a ventilation unit to make the degradation process in the toilet aerobic and to vent odorous gases, a collection system to remove excess liquid, and an access door for extracting the compost.

The material from composting toilets is used for agricultural purposes. It is best for domestic gardens and to enrich the soil. The material’s nutrient availability is very high.

How do Composting Toilets Work?

Composting toilets use the methods of decomposition and evaporation to recycle human waste. The process is natural. The Waste entering the toilets contains over 90% of water, which is later on evaporated and carried back to the atmosphere through the vent system. The small amount of remaining solid material will convert to useful fertilizing soil by natural decomposition.

The oxygen, moisture, heat, and organic material, all need to balance to ensure a productive environment—this balance essential for the aerobic bacteria to transform the waste into fertilizing the soil. A composting toilet will have to perform three processes as below: First, the waste and toilet paper must be made into compost without odor safely, and in a way that is easy to handle. Then liquid evaporation has to take place.

Composting toilets for cabins

Composting toilets for cabins are also available. Many recommend the Sun-Mar Self-Contained Composting Toilet is the best to be used in cabins. Since a high cost is involved in placing a septic tank, it is much easier to use, and the cost will reduce when using a compost toilet. Compost toilets are also easy to install in cabins. They are also eco-friendly.

Q. How Much do Composting Toilets Costs?

When pricing a toilet composting system, you should keep in mind what the costs would be both long-term and in comparison to septic of the sewage system. For example, most composting toilet systems will be between 25% to 75% less expensive than installing a septic system on your property. And that is just for the upfront costs. Composting toilets will continue to save money over the years on water costs, while also producing a valuable soil additive (humus).

If you are flexible and handy with tools, you can build a compost toilet yourself for under $50. The popular “Five Gallon Bucket” compost toilet can be put together in a matter of hours and be ready to use the same day you build it (to see instructions and plans, read “How to Build a Compost Toilet”). However, do not expect these models to pass building code requirements and be aware that they require more labor and maintenance than their manufactured cousins. These models may not be well suited to many households, especially those with regular use by multiple persons.

The next step up in composting toilets is the portable composting toilet models popular with boaters, RVs, and even campers. Some models are suitable for home use as well, while others are meant for outdoor applications. The self-contained “mobile” models produced by the popular composting toilet manufacturer Sun-Mar starts at about $1300 USD.

The most affordable self-contained composting toilet models tend to be just a bit more. These models are built for home use, although the cheaper models tend to be sized for only a couple of users and occasional use. Please read the ” Guide to Purchasing a Composting Toilet ” for more help in sizing your composting toilet to your needs, please read the “Guide to Purchasing a Composting Toilet”). For example, the BioLet 10 (the smallest model produced by BioLet) starts at about $1700, and Sun-Mar has a “Compact” self-contained model that runs about $1400 USD.

For an average family of four, however, these smaller models would not suffice. Most likely they would need a “remote” composting system (see “Types of Composting Systems” for a complete explanation of the differences between these systems). These models run quite a bit more. Sun-Mar’s Centrex 2000 AF, built for regular use by four to six individuals, costs about $1800 USD. However, this does not include installation costs, which may be considerable depending on where you are choosing to locate the reactor chamber. If you are not interested in a remote system, you should consider the BioLet 60XL, a large self-contained model meant for constant use by four individuals and costing around $2200.

None of these prices include shipping or installation costs, so that will need to be included in the budgeting for a composting toilet.

Although when you are initially shopping for a composting toilet the price may seem high compared to a flush toilet, once you factor in the costs of sewage or septic system construction, fees and maintenance, water costs, and also consider the environmental and social costs of using a flush toilet (For more on these costs, read “What is Wrong with a Flush Toilet” and “What are the Environmental Benefits of Composting Toilets”) you will see that a composting toilet is actually a very sound investment for your family.

Q. Are Composting Toilets Safe?

Composting toilets provide an important tool to deal with the ever-growing problem of dealing with human waste in a safe manner for the environment. When used correctly, composting toilets produce an end-product that is both odor-free and pathogen-free, and completely safe to use as a soil amendment.

However, improperly composted materials can pose a health risk, just as untreated waste from a flush toilet will threaten human health if let into the environment before being fully treated. In many ways, however, composting toilets are safer for the environment than septic and sewage systems. Septic systems pose considerable risks for groundwater contamination in many areas, and sewage systems often fail, the end result is that raw, untreated human waste is allowed to seep into our environment. Composting toilets run none of these risks.

The process of turning human waste into an environmentally safe and usable product (compost) will take between three months to a few years depending on the system, the climate in which it is located, and the composting materials’ temperature. For example, some countries, Sweden, will allow the urine from certain composting toilet models to be used in agricultural applications in as early as six months. Human feces pose a much greater risk to human health if not composted properly. For this reason, many countries (the United States included) ban the use of human compost on agricultural crops. However,. For it is generally approved for non-edible plant uses by most government agencies.

Many government agencies require that composted feces be allowed to break down for a minimum of one year before being used as a mulch around non-edible plants, trees, and bushes. However, many “humanure” advocates say that human feces are completely safe for all agricultural purposes once fully composted. For example, Joseph Jenkins, author of The Humanure Handbook, is a strong advocate of using composted humanure for agriculture. These advocates have argued that the reluctance to use this compost agriculturally in the United States and elsewhere arises more from finding the idea aesthetically unpleasing than from real, scientifically-based concerns.

However, regardless of the agricultural argument surrounding humanure application to crops, as long as basic instructions are followed and adequate time is allowed for the composting process, the end-product produced by composting toilet systems should be safe to handle use. Composting toilet systems require that owners assume the responsibility to monitor the composting process and ensure that the materials are fully composted before application.

Education about composting toilets is an important part of encouraging their use in the so-called “developed” world. Many health agencies in the United States and elsewhere have little knowledge of these systems and treat them with considerable suspicion. Misinformation and suspicion about composting toilets often make it difficult to get a permit approving their use. To combat this suspicion, owners and users of composting toilets must be open to discussing the systems with others and promoting their use.

Q. How do you install a composting toilet?

Q. Do you put toilet paper in a composting toilet?

Q. Can you poop in a composting toilet?

Q. How long does a composting toilet take to work?

Q. Where should I empty a composting toilet?

Q. Can you have a flushing toilet in a tiny house?

Q. Can you pee in a composting toilet?

Q. Do composting toilets smell bad?

Q. How does a compost toilet work in a tiny house?

Q. How often do you have to empty a composting toilet?

Q. What is the best composting toilet on the market?

Q. What is the best toilet for a tiny house?

Q: Do composting toilets smell?

A: If they are well-maintained, they should not smell at all. Some models even have less arguably fewer odors than conventional toilets (vacuum-flush composting toilets). If there is an odor, there is something very wrong with how the system is being maintained. Modern-day manufactured composting toilets bear absolutely no resemblance to outdoor outhouses.

Q: Why would anyone want to purchase one?

A: There are many reasons people are interested in buying composting toilets. For some, it may be because they are located in an area where septic and sewage systems are difficult or costly to build and maintain. Many others choose to compost toilets for environmental reasons (for more information, read “What are the Environmental Benefits of Composting Toilets “).

Q: Are Composting Toilets Expensive?

A: When you initially compare them at a price to a regular flush toilet, composting toilets may seem a little costly. But when you compare the costs over time, you will find that composting toilets are actually the better choice financially. With a composting toilet, you will save on water, sewage, or septic fees and produce a valuable soil additive. For more details, check out the article “How Much do Composting Toilets Cost?”

Q: What is the end product of the toilet composting process like, and what do I do with it?

A: After the composting process is finished, you will have a dry, fluffy odorless material that looks a little bit like soil. It is safe to touch and is a great fertilizing source for plants, shrubs, and trees. For more information about using the compost from composting toilets, read “What is Humanure and What Can I do With It?” If you are concerned about the safety of composting toilets, you may also want to read “Are Composting Toilets Safe?”

Although these are some of the most common questions asked, if you have more questions answered or want to read more articles and reviews of popular composting toilets models (including a Buyers Guide to Composting Toilets), please leave a comment below.

Q: What are composting toilets and how do they work?

Composting toilets are an important alternative to flush toilet systems. Unlike the sewage or septic-based flush toilet system, composting toilets rely on little or no water in dealing with human waste. Instead, composting toilets turn human waste into a valuable soil additive that can be used as a soil amendment. Users will generally add organic brown matter to the toilet (such as sawdust or peat moss) instead of water. Basic toilet composting systems rely on either a series of containers or a large centralized composting chamber. For a full description, read What are Composting Toilets?

Q: How are composting toilets good for the environment?

Toilet composting systems benefit the environment in multiple ways. They can play a major role in preserving one of the world’s most important and rapidly diminishing resources: water. They also produce a valuable end-product (compost) that can improve the environment and less reliance on chemical fertilizing products. Composting toilets can also lessen the threat of groundwater contamination (from septic systems), environmental pollution (from broken sewage pipes), and help recycle all sorts of organic household waste. For more information, read “What are the Environmental Benefits of Composting Toilets?”

Q: How safe is composting toilets?

The short answer is completely safe when used properly. However, when not installed and used according to specifications, they may pose health risks – just as septic and sewage systems also pose considerable health risks when used or maintained improperly. For a full discussion, read the entire article “Are Composting Toilets Safe?”

Q: Where can I put in a composting toilet system?

Some people confuse composting toilets with outhouses or pit latrines, assuming they must be installed outdoors. This simply is not true. Most current toilet composting systems are built for indoor use (the exception being certain portable composting toilet models). Most are meant for household use, but in many other locations, compost toilets can be installed. Increasingly government facilities, national parks, and colleges are installing them both because of their benefit for the environment and society and serve as demonstration projects for the public. For more ideas about where toilet composting systems can be used, check out the article “Where Can Composting Toilets Be Used?”

Q: What do toilet composting systems cost?

If you are actively searching for a toilet composting system, this is probably a major question you have when comparing it to other waste disposal systems. Although composting toilets may seem much more expensive than a flush toilet system, there are many hidden costs in the latter. Some research will show that composting toilets are usually the best choice financially. Not only do they cost considerably less than installing a septic system or paying sewage fees over time, but you will also save on water and be producing a valuable end product as well. For complete information, read “How Much do Composting Toilets Cost?”

Q: What can I put in a composting toilet?

Besides the obvious (human waste and toilet paper), you will find that your composting toilet is a wonderful way to recycle a wide variety of the organic waste that your household produces. Everything from kitchen scraps, shredded paper, coffee grounds, and even yard waste can be put into your toilet composting system. For a full discussion and many more examples of what can go into your composting toilet, read “What Can You Put In a Composting Toilet?”

Q: How do I dispose of the end-product of the toilet composting process?

The end product of toilet composting is humus or compost, and it is a valuable soil additive. Some refer to this end-product as “humanure” and can use it to fertilize trees, bushes, flowers, and more. For a full discussion, read “What is Humanure and What Can I do With It?”

For more articles and information, you can return to the Toilet Composting homepage and search through the archives of dozens of useful articles about different aspects of building, purchasing, maintaining, and using composting toilets.

Your Thoughts

We have shared some of the best composting toilets in this post, namely composting toilet reviews. Just ascertain your requirements and select the best composting toilet out of above mentioned. Check this for a regular toilet comparison chart.

We are forced to think of a substitute when we know that we use 7,665 gallons of water every year in the US. Composting toilets are a great alternative for such a problem. So in this post, “composting toilet reviews,” we shall discuss various aspects of the best composting toilet.

What is a Composting Toilet?

Composting toilet system is a processing unit for toilet paper, human excreta, and other waste material. These are also known as waterless toilets, dry toilets, etc. The human excrement is mixed with coir, sawdust, and peat moss to assist the aerobic processing, and they absorb liquids and eliminate odor. This process in composting toilet is fast as compared to other like in septic tanks. This way, all the waste is converted into a dry product that can be handled with the least risk and can be used as a natural fertilizer in the soil for plants and trees.

Types of Composting Toilets

Based on the installation and assembly system, the composting toilets can be of different types like active composting toilet, passive, self-contained, centralized, in house, and out of house toilets.

Top Composting Toilet Reviews

We have already shown above some of the best composting toilets. But still, there are some toilets which are necessary to be reviewed here so that you can decide on selecting the best toilet 2021 as per your requirements and affordability.

Nature’s Head Dry Composting Toilet / Standard Crank Handle

This composting toilet from Nature’s Head is made in the USA, and it has a full-size elongated toilet seat.  It is very user-friendly as it can be easily installed and disassembled in few seconds for emptying the toilet. It has a hand crank agitator, which provides faster composting. This hand crank handle is mounted in the base on either side of the toilet. It is molded, designed, totally self-contained portable composting toilet. Fan and 5’ vent hose can also be mounted on either side of the toilet. It has a translucent tank which gives you a visual look at its capacity. For bulk clearing, the rear side of the liquid tank is cut out. It also has a 12V power plug as per the company you can go without dumping the toilet for 6 weeks. Overall it is a great toilet. It works very well for various weathers. Its functioning is very smooth. This toilet is reasonably priced at $960, considering other expensive composting toilets. Based on reviews at amazon, it has received a rating of 4.8 stars. Click to buy and more about composting toilet reviews Nature’s Head Dry Composting Toilet / Standard Crank Handle

Sun-Mar Excel Non-Electric Self-Contained Composting Toilet, White NE

This Sun-Mar toilet is a non-electric composting toilet. It is perfect for off-the-grid applications. It has low profile unit, which goes well with any bathroom. It is a 100% non-polluting composting toilet that does not use any water. It is self-contained, i.e., the toilet seat and catchment chamber are located in one unit. This type of toilet is particularly good for places where space is a constraint. This toilet has a bio drum with an adjustable diameter and a recessed handle for processing compost. This toilet, very effectively and odorless, converts human excreta safe fertilizing soil. This particular toilet model is good for medium to high capacity. It is perfect for a 2-3 people family in residential accommodation or 5-7 people at a cabin on the weekend. This composting toilet is priced at around $1750 at Amazon, and it has received a user rating of 3.3. To know more about composting toilet reviews and buying this Sun Mar toilet, click Sun-Mar Excel Non-Electric Self-Contained Composting Toilet, Model# Excel-NE

Advantages of Best Composting Toilets

These toilets have many more advantages. There is no need for taking wastes to the treatment centers. They save a lot of water, so the environment is friendly. Besides these pros, these toilets are expensive and difficult to maintain. These toilets are safe to use provided you take necessary care and maintain proper moisture, oxygen, and heat. Your Thoughts We have shared some of the best composting toilets in this post, namely composting toilet reviews. Just ascertain your requirements and select the best composting toilet out of above mentioned. Check this for a regular toilet comparison chart. Please share this post with your friends.
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